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New Covid eviction prevention project for Southwark residents gets underway

New Covid eviction prevention project for Southwark residents gets underway

PRESS RELEASE
November 2020

Our new programme will provide essential intensive support to renters in the private sector who are threatened with eviction

We’re excited to announce a new Covid Private Renters Project for tenants in Southwark, delivering our intensive 10-week intervention with residents with complex needs to address arrears, financial hardship, health and wellbeing concerns that have led to an insecure tenancy.

We’ve developed a unique intervention for tenants and landlords that combines intensive practical and wellbeing support, legal advice, and mediation. It is designed to meet a pressing current need in which legal uncertainties around eviction, increasing arrears and financial hardship, and insecure employment could potentially lead to a rise in homelessness across the UK. The project aims to prevent that by strengthening landlord-tenant communication and supporting mediation, as well as specialist legal support provided our partners, Southwark Law Centre.

The programme will be delivered in partnership with Southwark Council and Southwark Law Centre with funding from Guys’ and St Thomas’ Charity. As the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated, housing is a key driver of health, and secure, safe housing is foundational to our health outcomes. We’re excited to be collaborating with these partners to support the health and wellbeing of residents in the Southwark by addressing housing as a social determinant of health.

Councillor Helen Dennis, cabinet member for social support and homelessness, said: “Tackling homelessness has always been best approached as prevention rather than cure. So we’re delighted to be able to support those in the private sector who are vulnerable to becoming homeless due to eviction. Alongside Kineara and Southwark Law Centre, we hope to use a collaborative approach to help people remain in a safe and secure home with their families, especially during such difficult and economically uncertain times.”

The project comes at a critical time for renters in the private sector, as the Government’s eviction moratorium came to an end on 20th September. Shelter estimates that over 300,000 renters have fallen into arrears since the pandemic started, with perhaps many more in danger of being made homeless once the furlough scheme ends and unemployment rises.

Kieron Boyle, CEO at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity says: “We know that the economic impact of the pandemic disproportionately affects those who already shoulder the greatest burden of ill health. We’re delighted to be working with Kineara, Southwark Council and the Southwark Law Centre to protect the health of those at risk of eviction. Through a package of practical support we can help prevent insecure housing driving health inequalities. This will have impact locally as well as important lessons for national policy.”

ENDS

Notes to editors:

About Kineara

Kineara is an award winning community interest company that offers holistic support services to families, individuals and young people going through challenges in housing, education and employment.

About Southwark Law Centre

Southwark Law Centre is a charity whose mission is the relief of poverty, suffering and distress through the provision of free, specialist and confidential legal advice.

About Guys’ St Thomas’ Charity

Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity is an independent urban health foundation. They work with Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and others to improve health in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, and beyond.

For media enquiries contact Melanie Sirinathsingh on 07800545607 and msirinathsingh@kineara.co.uk, or visit our website www.kineara.co.uk

Posted by kineara in Community, Housing, Latest
Putting racial equity on our agenda

Putting racial equity on our agenda

June 2020

In the last few weeks, the disproportionate effects of Covid-19 on BME people, the Government’s pandemic responses, and police brutality in Black communities the US and the UK have brought the impacts of racial inequality back into full public view.

As a non-profit working in some of London’s most diverse and most unequal boroughs, we feel it is important at this time to make clear our solidarity with the protestors taking to the streets in the last few weeks, and with Black communities and organisations who have been challenging racism in the myriad of ways it manifests.

We also write these words on behalf of the people we represent and work to support, and centering their experience. While our work doesn’t involve us directly in racial justice campaigning, we aim to break down barriers for people living at the sharp end of poverty and inequality. We support people to navigate a system (be it housing, education, or welfare) that is often discriminatory or marginalising, and to manage the system as it impacts them – all the while understanding how culture, family networks, community belonging and identity marks our experiences. This is an important part of our systemic and strength-based support.

We want, humbly, to issue a call to those in our sector – non-profits services, charities, trusts and funders, social enterprises or community interest companies – to speak up and speak out. Many of our organisations work is full view of the racial marginalisation that persists in our society. We work to combat the effects of the trauma it causes and barriers it creates.

But too often we do so without centering or naming the cause. Racial inequalities in housing, health, wealth, education, and criminal justice don’t happen by accident, they are the result of systemic and institutionalised racism is deeply engrained in our public and private institutions – including in the non-profit sector. Campaigns like #CharitySoWhite and organisations like the Ubele Initiative are bringing light to this issue.

As a multicultural team, we believe it’s important for these conversations to be alive in the work place,  and for leaders to create a safe, non-judgemental space that invites open dialogue about race and inequality. These conversations encourage us to look at self, our interactions with others and our own practice with the communities we serve.

Long-term systemic change will not come from just one community voice but with voices from all racial, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. This moment requires collective action to shine a light on the movement for Black lives and racial equality for all.

Posted by kineara in Community, Latest
Supporting the recovery of our communities

Supporting the recovery of our communities

As the impacts of Covid-19 and the lockdowns on our communities are becoming clearer, the inequality in society has been laid bare.

For us and many other organisations working with ‘vulnerable’ people, the reality of life at the sharp end of that inequality has always been acutely challenging, particularly when barriers to secure housing, stable employment, positive mental and physical health, and meaningful connections to community combine.

As a result, many of the impacts we are seeing are not new to us, they are only exacerbated by the unequal effect of both the Covid-19 illness and the lockdowns that have been put in place to contain it.

Supporting your needs

Kineara has broad experience working with people with complex needs to address concerns over housing, mental health, family support, and employment. This support is both practical and emotional, and our practitioners use holistic approaches that can include anything from writing housing applications to counselling sessions.

We also provide consultation and supervision to housing associations and schools, so we can support your own frontline staff to identify and support those people that need more complex care.

We know that many organisations will be at low capacity right now, just when the demand for support is greatest. Whether you are a housing association, school or local authority, you will likely have seen the gaps in provision and the challenges that people in your communities face, as the lack of funding, availability of staff, and the severity of the impacts of Covid-19 on the vulnerable becomes clear.

We can support you to prevent people falling through those gaps.

But we want to hear from you – if you are a school, housing association or local authority, get in touch! There are many ways that we may be able to provide you the support your community needs as we begin to address the effects of the pandemic, including over-the-phone supervision and consultation, trainings, support interventions for vulnerable residents or communities, and more.

Posted by kineara in Community, Education, Housing, Latest
Relief and support during Covid-19: A list of links and resources

Relief and support during Covid-19: A list of links and resources

We’ve put together a list of webpages and resources where people can find up-to-date information and support while the UK is tackling the Coronavirus crisis. In particular, these links are for those people who may be living in precarious situations, facing financial hardship, housing insecurity, or mental health concerns. Follow the links below to find information on managing bills, dealing with landlords, and more.

We have also included resources for groups who may be at a higher risk of either illness or who are likely to become vulnerable during the lockdown period, which you can find below.

Last updated 31.01.21

Links to Government Covid-19 relief measures

The Government has issued a list of what it considered key workers at this time and therefore who has school eligibility at this time: Guidance for schools and education providers.

The Government’s full guidance for tenants, landlords, housing providers and local authorities can be found here. The current measures mean no-one (including private renters, social renters, property guardians, and people in TA) will face eviction for three months, and LHA rates have been increased to cover 30% of rent.

Turn2Us has a regularly updated webpage with guidance on all the new and existing benefits. This page also includes a benefits calculator and a list of grants available for people in financial hardship.

StepChange, the debt charity, also has advice about how to manage bills and debts during this time, with advice about what creditors and utility companies may do to help individuals unable to pay.

The government has promised that utility companies will not be allowed to disconnect credit meters at this time, and customers in financial distress will be supported by their energy company to look at options for reducing payments or debts.  This link also includes advice for people with pre-pay meters, and a list of utility company helplines.

Several mobile and internet providers including Vodaphone, EE and O2 have agreed to protect vulnerable customers by removing broadband data caps, providing support to those who cannot meet their bills, and offer affordable packages.

And here is information about how parents and carers can access supermarket vouchers for children eligible for free school meals.

Guidance and support for specific groups

Renters

Measures toprotect private renterswere revised over the last week and may still change again, but for nowGeneration Renthas gathered the latest Government support packages that are available, and how to access them. 

Shelter has regularly updated guidance for bothrenters and home owners about their rights and benefitsduring this time. 

But there are calls for more to be done, andLondon Renters Union are calling for rent suspensions, in line with the mortgage holidays offered to homeowners. They also have drafted atemplate letterrenters can use to negotiate rent holidays or decreases with their landlord. 

Advice4Renters provides free or low-cost legal advice and representation from expert housing specialists.   

Shelter’s free housing advice helpline 0808 800 4444 is open 8am-8pm on weekdays and 8am-5pm on weekends, 365 days a year. 

BME groups

The Race Equality Foundation has guidance on how Covid-19 may impactblack and minority ethnic people. While BME groups generally have a younger average age, risk factors like heart disease and diabetes are higher in African/Caribbean and South Asian groups. BME people are also more likely to be in key worker occupations and more likely to live in overcrowded conditions than white British people, and therefore potentially at higher risk of exposure to infection. 

The Ubele Initiative have adedicated Covid-19 support and resource page for BAME communities.You can also read Kineara’s case study with Ubele Initiative.

The GMCVO has put together this useful webpage of information, sources of support and resources for BAME communities 

The Indigo Trust has listed a number of organisations that it has funded to continue providing essential support to BME groups during Covid-19. You can read more about them and access further links here.  

Doctors of The World have publishedCovid-19 guidance for patients in a number of languages. The guidance is based on the government’s advice and health information and was produced in partnership with the British Red Cross, Migrant Help and Clear Voice. 

Askdoc have producedshort videos translating NHS England Covid-19 advicein variouslanguages. 

South Asian Health Foundation have a range ofresources and links about Coronavirus in South Asian languages. 

Europia is also working with Doctors of the World, providing them withtranslations of COVID-19 NHS Guidanceinto Bulgarian, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian and Lithuanian. 

Public Health England haveinformation for migrants translated into different languagesavailable to download. 

The BAME Stream is offering FREE culturally appropriate bereavement support and is now taking referrals. 

Victims of domestic abuse

Solace Women’s Aid, the Public interest Law Centre, and other specialist VAWG groups are concerned we will see a surge in violence in the home, as victims of abuse are unable to leave the home. They are calling forurgent action for domestic violence survivors during the lockdown, with a letter to the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government. They are also calling forrefuges to receive ring fenced Coronavirus funding. 

Solace Women’s Aid also offers a hub of resources for DV victims and survivors including free Covid-19 webinars and lists of safety measures if you are in an abusive relationship during Covid-19.  

The government has launched the Ask for Ani (Action Needed Immediately) codeword scheme to enable victims of domestic abuse to access immediate help from the police or other support services, from the safety of their local shop, or pharmacy. 

Safe Lives has a useful webpage for victims of domestic abuse. This includes a guide for staying safe during COVID-19, specialist joint-guidance for DV survivors  

Surviving Economic Abuse offers helpful resources for survivors whilst self-isolating, as well as practical issues including benefits. There is also useful information for professionals working with victims and survivors of economic abuse.

The Women and Girls Network offers a range of online resources covering mental health and wellbeing, educational tools and translations.  

Refuge and the National Domestic Abuse Helpline (0808 2000 247) has information about your rights and options, including legal help and help with housing.  

Women’s Aid is continuing to provide the Survivors’ Forum, an online resource for survivors of domestic abuse which can be accessed 24/7; live chat and email service. 

Asylum seekers and refugees

The Home Office has pledged tostop evicting asylum seekers from government accommodationfor a period of three months once their claim or appeal is decided. A decision will be made on Friday 3rdApril aboutwhether to suspend No Recourse to Public Funds policy. 

Here is useful advice forsupporting migrants and asylum seekersduring the crisis, with additional helplines. And here is apetition calling for people being held in immigration detention to be releasedso they can have proper access to healthcare. 

The Red Crosshas put together a webpage with various support for refugees, asylum seekers or vulnerable migrants.

Women for Refugee Women are supporting refugee and asylum-seeking women during the pandemic, from women who been made homeless during the pandemic to women who do not have the money to feed their children. You can find out more and donate to their appeal here.   

The Refugee Council, who has beencalling on the governmentto protect people seeking asylum and refugees at risk, has a regularly updated webpage on Changes to Asylum & Resettlement policy and practice in response to Covid-19’  

Joint letter on protecting migrants from COVID-19: Asylum Matters, Liberty, Medact and others have signed a joint letter to the Home Secretary calling for specific measures to protect migrants and the general population from COVID-19. This includes calls for the suspension of all NHS charging and data-sharing for the purposes of immigration enforcement and the suspension of the ‘no recourse to public funds’ conditions to ensure everyone can access support. You canread the letter and add your name here.

Right to Remain has a regularly updated webpage on the Changes to the asylum and immigration processesdue to Covid-19. You can find other resourcesformigrants and their advocates on the Migrant Information Hub 

Training 19/01/2021 (multiple dates): Trauma informed training on Housing Rights for Refugee and Migrant Women delivered by Baobab Women’s Project. The sessions will cover trauma-informed care, developing effective support services, migration and human rights, and housing.  

Training 27/01/2021, 18:00 – 20:00 GMT: Refugee Mental Health Training exploring psychosocial challenges faced by refugees and asylum seekers, experiences of depression and intergenerational trauma. The session is psychiatry trainee and diasporic medical student who will be drawing on their own personal experiences.  

Children in temporary accommodation

The Lancet has written a short comment about how children in temporary accommodation are at high risk of exposure to Covid-19 and potential direct and indirect health impacts of isolating in overcrowded, shared or confined spaces.

Disabled people

Scope has lots ofinformation for disabled peopleabout support that is available at this time. And here is guidance fortackling isolation during a time of ‘physical distancing’ to keep us socially connected, from AbilityNet, a charity that aims to ensure IT is available to everyone regardless of ability, including older and disabled people. 

Concerns have been raised by disabled rights organisations thatemergency changes to the Care Act means that local authorities could suspend their dutiesand refuse people assessments and care. 

Groups with accessibility needs 

Translated audio guidanceon COVID-19has beenupdatedby Doctors of the World. 

People with mental illness

Rethink Mental Illness has put together questions and answers forpeople living with mental illness and those who care for them, including prescriptions and carer visits. The government also madeemergency changes to the Mental Health Act last week, causing some concern that increased government powers will make it easier for people to be detained. 

Rethink Mental Ilness has also produced this guidance on the Covid-19 vaccine for people living with mental health. Under current proposals, people diagnosed and livinlg with severe mental illness are classed as a priority group to receive the vaccine. 

Mind has put together a webpage of information and tips to help you cope while the UK is tackling the Covid-19 pandemic. You can also call the infoline on 0300 123 3393 to takeabout mental health and where to get help near you.  

Local Covid-19 mutual aid groups

Bexley

Bexley Borough Covid-19 Mutual Aid Group (Facebook group)

Covid 19 – Mutual Aid Bexley Support & Inspiration (Facebook group)

Isolation Help Bexley

Hackney

Hackney Covid 19 Mutual Aid (Facebook group)

The Boiler House N16

Tower Hamlets

Tower Hamlets Covid 19 Community Support (Facebook group)

Stepney Green mutual aid group (WhatsApp group)

Limehouse Aid (WhatsApp group)

Search for a mutual aid group in your area or for a friend in need: Covid Mutual Aid UK

Posted by kineara in Community, Education, Employment, Housing, Latest
Kineara’s response to coronavirus closures

Kineara’s response to coronavirus closures

23 March 2020

 

Last week the UK Government made the decision to shut down schools as the country continues to address the coronavirus spread throughout the UK. This was in addition to several other Government measures to increase social distancing and offer some relief to people effected by the virus.

 

At this time, our priority concern is for the safety and wellbeing of our staff and the people we work with, many of whom are being particularly impacted by the virus and its broader consequences. For families who are already in precarious housing, on low incomes, living in overcrowded homes or with children with complex needs, the coming months will be particularly challenging.

 

We are thankful that at this time we are able to temporarily sustain our services, despite having to reduce the level of support we can offer. Whilst the schools are closed, and social distancing is being advised, we won’t be able to run sessions or make visits to our clients in the way we usually would.

 

But, we are doing what we can to overcome the disruption and continue to provide the best support we can over the phone, via calls and video chat. We have been speaking with our school and housing partners to make arrangements about how we can provide school-home services and housing support going forward. We also are connecting with local voluntary services so that we can make sure people have access to essential support through this time. We hope that, with enough planning, we can continue to support you in meaningful ways, including support for the impact of the coronavirus. We’ll continue to review our work as we go forward.

 

We are also preparing a list useful links of local services, mutual aid groups, and community support for our website in coming days, so that anyone who we have worked with now or in the past can find out what is on offer in their area.

 

The families and households we are currently working with will be, if they have not been already, contacted by their practitioner in the coming days to make ongoing arrangements.

 

We know that for many people this will be a stressful and worrying moment. At Kineara, we are always focused on how best to support people through challenging times – and for the next few weeks, we know many people in London and the UK will face many challenges. We will do the best we can to help you through it.

 

 

The Kineara Team

 

 

 

Posted by kineara in Community, Education, Employment, Housing, Latest
Kineara’s team ‘missionstorm’ day: An update

Kineara’s team ‘missionstorm’ day: An update

Last month, our team decided it was time for a moment of reflection. With several new projects coming up at the end of this year, and a busy 2020 in the works, we knew it was the perfect opportunity to take a step back and take stock of where we have come from, where we are going and make sure that we do not lose sight of our mission as we grow. Rather than a brainstorm, we decided what we needed was a ‘missionstorm’, and this is the task we set ourselves.

As many people working in the social enterprise world will know, new opportunities, connections and projects offer both exciting possibilities and an inevitable challenge. For us, the biggest challenge was this: How do we bring our support services into new contexts without compromising our mission? How do we make sure that we are staying true to our values and putting the needs of those we serve first? How do we make sure our whole team collaborates and contributes to our projects and mission?

Since Kineara was first founded with our Rent Support Programme (RSP), which addresses and prevented evictions of vulnerable families in social housing, our offer has expanded to include mid-term tenancy sustainment programmes, educational wellbeing and support, employment support and our most recently designed intervention, Resettling, which has been created for people who have been homeless or in temporary accommodation to move back into sustainable housing with our support. In amongst that, we’ve still found the time to deliver community cohesion projects and been part of innovative participatory research on issues of housing services and improving pathways through temporary accommodation.

Throughout that time, we’ve kept to Kineara’s ethos: that all our support is 1) holistic, understanding that people’s lives are complex, with often multiple challenges that impact each other; and 2) people-centred and strength-based, so that we always recognise and emphasise the skills, aspirations and strengths that are inherent in everyone.

Nonetheless, as our provision ramps up we knew it was important that, as a team, we were all working towards the same mission, and driving towards the same goal. We looked at how other organisations larger and smaller than ours, both in the charity sector and outside of it, wrote about their mission and what it said about them. And then, we looked again at our own mission and asked ourselves the question, does this still speak to the heart of our work? What really is driving us? What do we really want to see as a result of the work we are creating?

And after some discussion, we refined our thoughts into a new mission statement:

It was then time to take a good look at our values. While it was all very well putting a mission statement together, what good was it if our values weren’t aligned to it? So, we took the opportunity to choose and discuss key values that motivated each of us in our lives and work, to build an understanding of our team’s character and motivations. It was wonderful to see what people felt was most important to them – sincerity, effectiveness, passion, respect, self-awareness, resilience, accountability, justice and collaboration – were all named as key values in their lives and work.

As anyone who works in social impact will understand, it is the passion reflected in the words above that motivates many to commit to serving people and communities in their work. With such a committed team, it was easy to consolidate these shared individual values into a set of principles that will guide Kineara’s approach and work for the next year.

With the revised mission and updated values in mind, we then turned our attention to project mapping. Of course, as a social business with a community focus, project planning is made that bit more challenging because we not only need clear aims, goals, monitoring plans and a valid theory of change, but we also need to make sure each project is also financially viable so that we can be sustainable and continue to grow. This was our jumping point; as a small organisation with multiple projects running together, we felt that honing our processes, roles and expectations would be key for achieving our mission as a team.

So we took the time to envision a life cycle of a typical Kineara project, creating for ourselves a live ‘map’ where we are able to see at what stage each of our team members are needed, what contributions they may make to each phase and how each role intersects with the each other.

This became a really valuable and useful exercise that gave each team member far greater clarity over the important part they play in our project delivery and achievements. We are, clearly, a sum of our parts! In many ways, the exercise was a humbling one which left each of us with a great appreciation for each other’s work, as well as a recognition of how we work together throughout a project to bring it to completion.

Posted by kineara in Impact, Latest
Practitioner insights: How complex cases can impact our mental health and wellbeing

Practitioner insights: How complex cases can impact our mental health and wellbeing

Operating within frontline roles, our practitioners work directly with individuals and families experiencing mental health problems and/or multi-complex needs. Following World Mental Health Day, we ask our practitioners to share experiences relating to mental health and wellbeing at work, including the impact of working on intense cases and proven ways to support their own mental health and wellbeing.

There is a strong link between our mental and physical health and just like our physical health, our mental health needs looking after. Research indicates that one in four of us will experience some form of mental ill health in the course of a year. What’s more, MHFA believes mental health lies on a continuum, which like a spectrum, can change overtime depending on early identification, prevention and treatment.

Having delivered a range of specialist programmes that address key barriers to housing security, employment and education, our practitioners understand the importance of providing appropriate support to people experiencing mental ill health as part of their person-centred, holistic approach. However, we often forget that support professionals – be it, social workers, health professionals or support workers – who provide vital support to others, can also be affected by the intensity of the cases they work with.

Multi-complex needs and intense support

Rujia, our dedicated school-based practitioner, explains how the complex nature and intensity of certain cases means that some personal impact is almost inevitable: “In general, I think when working in this field it is difficult not to be impacted by other people’s circumstances because of the compassion we feel for others.”

“Previously, I worked with someone from our drop-in sessions who needed emotional support on an issue I have experienced myself. I felt a lot of empathy for this client and instantly found myself checking whether I am over-identifying with what she is saying and how best I can help her.”

“It’s important to reflect on our feelings and emotions and check where our responses are coming from to ensure our focus is the client. Being aware of our feelings also helps us to recognise the impact clients can have on us as it can trigger emotions in us that we then need to work through.”

Liz, our NLP practitioner echoes this: “In relation to the type of work that we do my first instinct is to support those who need support the most. Even when I feel like my cup is half empty, I find myself still pouring from my cup because I feel like someone else needs it more.”

Whilst drawing from experience and tapping into our positive traits can offer insight when dealing with cases, it’s important to check what impact a client’s situation is having on us, adds Rujia. “It’s very important to be mindful of whether we are over-identifying because that could make us move away from fully recognising what the client needs. We have to remember that everyone is different and therefore may experience things differently and need different things.”

A reflective approachA reflective approach

As a practitioner, Rujia highlights the importance of reflecting on our own feelings and emotions and check where our responses are coming from: “This ensures our focus is the client. Being aware of our feelings is also very important so we can recognise the impact clients have on us, as it can trigger emotions in us that we then need to work through,” she says.

“Sometimes even when I’m not working, I am thinking about the family and what else I need to do to support them! This can become unhealthy because it can become mentally and physically draining and we all need our break away from work and spend some time in our personal lives,” explains Rujia.

Fortunately, this is something Rujia recognised during a de-briefing session with a colleague: “Upon reflection, I was able to identify why I was feeling so tired. I then had to consciously make the effort to put some healthy boundaries in place by agreeing what goals I can work on with the family, as well as sticking to my working hours unless working evenings was planned for a specific reason. The families we work with often have multiple issues and we are working with for a limited time period, so having boundaries helps me work more effectively and not spread myself too thinly.”

“The families we work with often have multiple issues and we are working with for a limited time period, so having boundaries helps me work more effectively and not spread myself too thinly.”

The impact of mental health has huge social and economic costs; studies reveal the total economic cost in England is estimated at £105 billion per year and that 84 percent of UK line managers believe they are responsible for employee wellbeing, but only 24 percent have received relevant training. “It’s that energy and love which is fine but I think if you start to feel like it’s affecting you outside of the workplace it will affect the amount of time you spend at work,” says Liz, “I’ve learnt to lean on some of the support of my manager and team, especially if I feel like I’m having a day where there are a lot of intense cases or I just need some support.”

Mental health in the workplace

When it comes to looking after our mental health in the workplace, Liz and Rujia have found peer supervision particularly helpful. “It’s an opportunity to reflect on my work and the impact of the work on my own well-being and the importance of our own well-being in this field of work. Having a supportive supervisor who understands the impact of working with intense and complex cases is very important, not just for our own wellbeing but the wellbeing of the families we support,” says Rujia.

Reflecting on past cases, Liz adds: “In supervision, we can talk through difficult cases and dissect the different barriers and/or the crisis that individual is experiencing. In that space you kind of offload everything going on at work or personal life.”

“One thing we learnt was the Mental Health Continuum – that our place on the scale is constantly changing and that most of the time there are no absolutes in mental health.”

Mental health in the workplaceSince completing the MHFA training, Tam, Comms Officer at Kineara, believes that she is better equipped to offer a listening ear and support to our team of practitioners, and more aware of what signs to look out for. “I now understand how and why dealing with complex and intense cases can impact the wellbeing of our support practitioners. One of the most important things we learned was the Mental Health Continuum – that our place on the scale is constantly changing and that most of the time there are no absolutes in mental health. Sometimes it’s just taking the time to check in, ask twice and listen.”

The power of mediation

Despite the intense workload, our practitioners are passionate about the work they do. “Once I started seeing work as helping anyone in need which could even be myself, then I started seeing work/life balance as one thing. Supporting people and practicing self-love is part and parcel of who am, so I don’t really see it as I’m leaving work on the coat hanger and going home, I see it as just a part of me,” says Liz.

Crucially, both Rujia and Liz highlight the importance of looking after our own wellbeing to be able to give their best to the people and families they support and be emotionally available for them. “I spend some time over the weekends when I am not working to do something relaxing, this can be something as simple as having a long bath or going out for dinner with a friend,” says Rujia. “This allows me to support people in any capacity in any way I can, even in my community/block or within my family – it doesn’t stop at work! It’s like a way of life – when you see it as a way of life you see beyond the crisis or the issue and you see the person for who they are,” adds Liz.

“Having someone facilitate our thoughts that are there but just need writing down on paper, so it’s seen and heard. Everyone needs encouragement and mediation, nobody can function without the support from another, including us as practitioners!”

Liz adds that practicing self-awareness to inspire the best in herself and others is so important: “I believe everyone is an expert in their own life, they are the only person who has experienced what they are telling you in entirety and full context, so the most important thing is to listen because every situation is a new situation and may require a new way of approaching things. Once they tell you their stories and their journey you realise that anyone could be in that position.”

She adds: “That’s why mediation is so important; having someone facilitate our thoughts that are there but just need writing down on paper, so it’s seen and heard. Everyone needs encouragement and mediation, nobody can function without the support from another, including us as practitioners!”

Find out more about our work. 

Image credit: Mashable/Vicky Leta

Posted by kineara in Community, Latest
How self-determination can impact wellbeing

How self-determination can impact wellbeing

From poverty to income inequality, and rising mental health concerns to the housing crisis, many of the core challenges we face today stem from an economic system that maintains inequality and often hits the most vulnerable hardest. However, studies show that feeling engaged and in control of our lives can elevate our wellbeing and development, despite our circumstances.  

Self-determination, which refers to the process by which a person feels in control and empowered over their own life, can significantly improve mental health and wellbeing, according to growing research.

Psychologists posit that self-determination can lead to more positive, sustainable outcomes, including in mental health and emotional wellbeing, resilience, and healthy social and psychological development. In fact, the capacity to make the right decisions for one’s wellbeing and feeling empowered to do so, can result in people leading longer, healthier and happier lives.

Alternatively, feeling a continued lack of self-control and uncertainty in our lives can have far-reaching consequences for our mental health and wellbeing, from the way we respond to and address challenges in our lives, to how we operate in our community and broader society.

At the individual level, people who feel they have lower control over their day-to-day lives are more likely to experience a chronic stress response; their ability to cope suffers and feelings of insecurity about the world often heighten.  This stress response can lead to poorer mental and physical health, which are experienced at a greater rate by disadvantaged and vulnerable communities.

Although the link between poorer health and socio-economic factors such as low income and educational inequality is well established, the ‘perceived’ lack of control on a micro or individual level, can too, lead to feelings of disempowerment, and in turn, poorer wellbeing outcomes. This is often marked by poorer mental health including depression and anxiety, which in turn, influences health damaging choices like smoking or increased alcohol consumption. Studies suggest that those who exercise control over their lives and make decisions in their best interest, even small day-to-day decisions, are more likely to cope better through stressful situations.

The impact of poverty and structural inequalities

A recent report by George Bangham at the Resolution Foundation suggests there’s more to life than economics, but that it still really matters. Crucially, the report identifies the need for safety, security and stability, particularly in housing and employment.

Bangham presents several examples highlighting the need for security in life, including housing tenure being strongly associated with higher wellbeing and that whilst a job may increase wellbeing, the well-being drop from losing a job is bigger than the wellbeing gain from getting into work.

Among its findings the report concludes: “The best prospects for policymakers targeting future increases in national wellbeing lie in raising job quality, raising incomes, particularly at the lower end, and policies to improve security in the housing market.”

Further studies show that poverty– which today may likely include continued low income and in-work poverty levels – has an impact on the brain and its development due to chronic stress causing toxicity. This, in turn, can impact decision making and cause a perceived lack of control over one’s life.

Notably, those who feel they have little control over their circumstances tend to find greater outer rewards in money and grades, while those who feel in control are motivated more by the inner sense of mastery and satisfaction, according to psychologist Richard deCharm. This highlights the causal nexus between poverty and a perceived lack of control, and those with a perceived lack of control finding greater reward in external conditions such as job and housing security or higher income.

Developing self-determination

With the proportion of people experiencing ‘deep poverty’ in London having increased in recent years and many workers still trapped in precarious jobs and insecure housing, we believe developing resilience and self-determination to address and work through the daily challenges is more important than ever.

Whilst there are things that we can’t change immediately like the socioeconomic context in which we live, there are things we can change. By focusing on what we can change including our responses to situations and the decisions we make, we can support our own wellbeing and positively impact those around us.

Having the right support is also key. Studies have demonstrated that having close friends and family has far-reaching benefits for your mental and physical health, whilst social isolation are loneliness lead to a greater risk of poorer mental health and wellbeing. On a broader level, while policy changes are essential, it is also important that vulnerable people have access to the right support. Findings from a landlords’ focus group conducted by Kineara, found that 80% of landlords believe their tenants would benefit from financial support and mediation, and 60% say their local council does not provide, or could provide further adequate support for tenants.

Holistic practice means understanding how these things intersect; using a holistic, strength-based, person-centred support enables Kineara’s practitioners to meet the needs of the individual or family and build on their strengths to maintain positive outcomes. By working 1:1 starting with where people are and working towards goals that individuals and families choose and aspire to achieve themselves, the tailored approach recognises the importance of strengthening the individual, the family unit and the community, whilst also taking their socio-economic situation into consideration.

Director of Kineara, Maria Morgan, adds: “We know that homelessness can affect someone’s mental health, we know that poverty can affect someone’s mental health, we understand that. So, it’s important for us to recognise those things because it can be a barrier for someone moving on, finding a job, it can be a barrier in so many ways. There’s nothing stronger than recognising and accepting where you are to move forward.”

Developing a level of self-determination is vital for self-development. Being able to guide the course of your life, despite the circumstances, takes focus, proactivity, self-confidence and a willingness to work through adversity. Recognising that you and only you have the power to change where you are in life: mentally, emotionally and practically, is a constant pursuit and a powerful tool for change.

Posted by kineara in Community, Latest, Research
Primary pupils in Hackney celebrate after completing educational and emotional support programme

Primary pupils in Hackney celebrate after completing educational and emotional support programme

 22 July 2019

Motivate to Educate pupils in Harrington Hill took part in certificate ceremony to celebrate their progress following intensive support.

Pupils at Harrington Hill Primary School in Clapton, Hackney, have celebrated the end of an intensive support programme dedicated to promoting wellbeing for themselves and their families in an event in the school.

The pupils, all aged between 6 and 11, took part in a certificate ceremony led by Kineara’s dedicated support practitioner in the school, Davinia, and attended by their parents and carers. The programme provided 15-week intensive support for emotional wellbeing, family relationships and communication, peer relationships, and practical support for the family.

Regarding the support, Harrington Hill have said: “We could not provide the much-needed level of support we do for our whole school community without Kineara’s M2E. Their work places the child completely at the centre and nothing is too much trouble. We can honestly say we’d be lost without the service, as would our pupils and their families.”

These are the latest of nearly 60 local primary school pupils and their families to take part in Motivate to Educate (M2E), an educational support intervention for vulnerable pupils designed and delivered by Kineara, a Tower Hamlets-based community interest company that delivers support interventions to schools, housing associations and local authorities across London. Early in 2019, Kineara’s work with Harrington Hill was shortlisted as a finalist in the Educational Resources Awards.

At a time when the mental health and emotional wellbeing of primary school pupils is of increasing concern, M2E aims to promote emotional awareness, communication and an understanding of emotions and expression, and has improved emotional awareness in 86% of pupils who have been supported by the programme. It aims to improve family wellbeing also, focusing on things like family routines, quality time, and relationship building, and improving wellbeing in nearly 70% of families.

One mother whose daughter took part in the programme said of her daughter: “She has opened up, she’s a different person. Now she’s learnt how to express herself. She’s learnt how to be more self-confident. She’s learnt so much and she got high grades in her exams. The teachers even said…she’s a completely different child, she’s just not the same. It’s amazing!”

The programme has also offered therapeutic counselling for parent who needed more in-depth mental health support, as well as providing practical support for housing concerns in nearly a third of the families on the programme, such as rent arrears, overcrowding and eviction threats. Supporting families into improved living environments can have important benefits for pupil’s wellbeing, and in turn, their ability and motivation to learn in school.

M2E will continue to be delivered to pupils at Harrington Hill Primary in the new school year, with additional wraparound services that include drop in support for parents and for school staff.

ENDS

FURTHER NOTES

 

About M2E

M2E works with pupils who are struggling to engage with their schooling to identity and explore where these challenges have come from. It provides key worker 1:1 support to their parents and carers, to explore how factors at home may be effecting parent’s ability to engage with their children’s education, including housing issues, financial concerns, relationship breakdown in the family, mental health and health support, and more. It offers a holistic approach to support, understanding that stable, healthy and happy family environments are vital when it comes to children’s educational attainment at school.
Find out more here: www.kineara.co.uk/m2e

About Kineara

Kineara is an award winning community interest company that provides tailor made support services to families and individuals in their community, in the areas of housing, education and employment. We support people to recognise their strengths and resilience in the face of challenging times. We do this by listening to what matters, reconnecting people to their passions and exploring how they might make the most of opportunities to impact their own world and the world around them. All of our support services area holistic and tailored to individual needs.

You can find out more about M2E here and the impact we’ve had here.

For quotes, high resolution photo files and more information, please contact Kineara’s Communications Lead, Melanie:
msinghji@kineara.co.uk
020 8976 1450

Posted by kineara in Community, Education, Latest
Our Impact Report 2019 is now published

Our Impact Report 2019 is now published

14 June 2019

Each year, we are committed to providing a report into our impact and our progress towards our key aims and mission. We are happy to share with you our Impact Report 2019, which collates the results from this year’s internal evaluation of our programmes.

2018 was a pivotal year for our organisation, with a new housing programmes as well as additional school services that have expanded our reach and provided school essential wraparound support. This work delivered against 4 key objectives:

  • To prevent evictions homelessness and housing insecurity of vulnerable people
  • To impact people lives and the organisations we work with positive transformation
  • To build strong, healthy, connected communities
  • To improve wellbeing, build on strengths and inspire confidence

 

To date, we have supported 309 people with either intensive support or drop-in advice across our housing, employment and education programmes.

We’ve provided mental health support to 118 households we’ve worked with.

We’ve prevented evictions of over 100 households since we began in 2012, and provided housing support to 68% of all households we’ve worked with.

In that time 60 people have been supported into work, education or training.

We have delivered 35 M2E interventions since September 2017, and improved emotional wellbeing in 86% of those pupils.

In that time we also delivered 6 workshops in schools for both parents and for pupils with 44 attendees, and drop in services for 42 parent’s and school staff members.

In addition to the impact we’ve had with  families, pupils and households, Kineara has grown its reach and voice through our social media presence, with 200 new supporters across all platforms and over 400 unique website visits per month. We’ve also been recognized for our partnership work in school, being shortlisted as a finalists for the Collaboration Award by Education Resources Awards and we are excited to have recently been invited to become member of Trust for London’s new initiative with the office the Mayor of London, the London Housing Panel, which aims to bring community representation to housing policy making for London.

 

You can read our Impact Report in full here.

Posted by kineara in Impact, Latest, Testimonial