Housing

Event: Shaping support services for private renters in Southwark

Event: Shaping support services for private renters in Southwark

Would you like to know how we’re supporting private renters in Southwark?

We are holding a virtual showcase for sector partners and community groups to hear about our work delivering the Southwark Private Renters Project in the borough. Come along to find out how we are supporting private renters to sustain tenancies and gain greater housing security. Register here.

The 60-minute session will cover:

• How the project is tackling barriers to secure, safe, affordable housing for private renters in Southwark

• How you can refer to the project

• What support do private renters and landlord receive from the project?

• How your service can collaborate with Kineara

• Hear from a client with lived experience about their journey

• Hear from other services in the borough including Southwark Law Centre, Impact on Urban Health and Southwark Council

Everyone is welcome, you don’t need to be based in Southwark to attend.

Register on Eventbrite. Instructions on how to join will be provided on registration.

Posted by kineara in Community, Event, Housing
Linking with landlords: Interview with Aisha

Linking with landlords: Interview with Aisha

At the start of our second year in Southwark supporting private tenants at risk with holistic housing and legal support, we added a new role to the team. Our Housing Link Worker, Aisha, tells us more about how it works.

Q. Can you tell me a bit about the work you deliver and your role on the project?

As a Housing Link Worker, it’s my job to mediate between landlords and tenants to see if I can strengthen an existing relationship to sustain the tenancy, or where someone’s tenancy cannot be sustained, to network and reach out to new landlords and agents and build relationships with them to accept new tenants.

Q. Can you tell me about some mediation you have done with a client and landlord?

Recently, I mediated with a landlord who was taking their tenant to court to evict. The tenant had been issued a notice but at that point was refusing to leave, so I visited them at home to find out more. The client was really upset; they felt the landlord had been harassing her. The tenant had had little contact with the Council, and the landlord also didn’t know what was going on. There were no arrears either – the landlord was entitled to the property back, but the tenant had no-where to go. While I was at the house, I called landlord and introduced myself. I let them speak for a while and explained what I could do to support them both. This calmed them down a lot, and said ‘OK, I won’t come over again tomorrow and I’ll leave it in your hands’.

Since then, opportunities for tenancies have come up and fallen through. The landlords calls and messages quite regularly, to find out what the tenant is doing in terms of moving on. Often tenants don’t update them because so much mistrust has built over time. The landlord thinks the worst, that the tenant is not doing anything. I will get in touch with then to let them know what viewings are coming up, what the tenants are up to, and it eases their mind.

‘Thank you, it was just nice to be able to have someone to talk to when everyone was making me out to be a bad landlord, in fact, I wasn’t getting paid the rent putting me in financial trouble, I appreciate having someone to listen to me and help get me get answers.’

Most of the landlords I’ve worked with just want to be heard. Sometimes they complain they don’t have support themselves from other service or the Council, and that sometimes the advice they give to tenant contradicts what’s right for them. Not all of them have it easy. One landlord was badly affected by Covid; she had reduced rent for tenant so they could keep up with payments, but she lost her job and so became dependent on rent as her only source of income and had to pursue eviction as a result. When it comes to paying off arrears, for example, many landlords are willing to give it some time while we apply for benefits, DHPs and other things to improve incomes. Then we can negotiate repayments in way that is affordable for the tenant and the landlord can trust the process.

Q. You came into a new role in the team in a position we hadn’t had before, the Housing Link Worker. We realized that we needed good relationships with landlords and were able to find suitable properties for our clients. How was it starting off in a completely new role?

What attracted me was the job description, because of experience in the kind of thing, so I wasn’t intimidated initially. But it was quite daunting starting out as it was up to me to start building connections and relationships with agents and landlords in the borough. The first few months were tough! And its hard when tenants have knockbacks – one client called me this week after being turned down by a landlord and she was devastated, and I know how hard it’s been for her.

Q. It can be difficult finding landlords with who are willing to rent to tenants who are low income. What kind of responses do you get from new landlords when you first approach them with a client?

We do work with landlords who rent specifically to tenants referred via the council and so have a longer experience of doing so. But whether they are experienced or not, often its all about relationship building and trust.

One landlord we now work with will take on any client we bring because he trusts what we are doing. They key is once we’ve housed someone with them, they feel more comfortable with new tenants we bring to them. I will often coach tenant before viewings, just to make sure they present the best of themselves.

There are landlords that prefer to deal with myself because of my relationship with the Council and the incentive scheme. We can discuss the administrative side of things, go through tenancy agreements, set up Universal Credit, all of that. For example, some tenants get stressed moving from, say, ESA to UC. Most landlords insist that they have UC, so I can say that I am going to sit down with them and make sure it is all set up properly and this eases their minds.

‘They are both absolutely excellent. They are balanced, honest, friendly, reliable and kind. They respect confidentiality, clearly know the legal and ethical aspects of their role and deal with challenges in a mature way. It’s really obvious that they care about their work and want to do their best. Even if this particular tenant situation does not come to any resolution without legal proceedings, it does not detract from their exceptional attitude and energy in trying to move this on.’

But when it comes to incentives, I’ve had to be quite headstrong negotiating as there are landlords who are aware they can receive competing offers from other Councils. But we try to take advantage of this for the tenant. If the rent is affordable for them, I’ll check in with the Housing officer as to how can be offered. The landlord almost always asks for more, so I’ve begun to negotiate longer tenancies in return, to guarantee that there is more security. So I have got a few 24 months tenancies for clients, at rent that is affordable for them, and we know they will be stable for at least a couple of years. Its about convincing everyone that the terms are right for them.

Q. It’s been hard work by the sounds of it – but are you feeling proud of what you’ve been able to achieve?

Yes! Finally housing a number of clients within the last couple of months has felt great. Particularly one that I’ve worked with for 6 months, who had been in temporary accommodation after being evicted and who has just moved in this week. There have been so many knock backs in that time, and it’s been hard for her and hard for me too. We’ve gone on a real journey together.

Also, building relationships with landlords and bringing them into our fold is something I’m really proud of. I always get excited when I see a text or email from landlords saying we’ve got these properties, or they call me and tell me the properties they got! Its feels like we’re building new possibilities in the borough for renters, and it great to be a part of it.

Posted by kineara in Community, Health and Wellbeing, Housing
Pupil counselling: Supporting the wellbeing of the youngest in our communities

Pupil counselling: Supporting the wellbeing of the youngest in our communities

Our latest research with over 6,000 schools has revealed that pupil mental health, wellbeing and pupil counselling are top support priorities this academic year. However, you know that effectively supporting pupil wellbeing can put additional strain on schools who are already facing many challenges in ensuring the ongoing education of pupils, especially during these uncertain and challenging times. This is where we come in.

We sat down with Gail, our lead education practitioner, to learn more about Tiana’s* story, the impact of pupil counselling in school, as well as some creative techniques and exercises. You can use these insights to build upon your own and/or get in touch to find out how we can support your school.


The negative impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on pupil mental health and wellbeing have far-reaching consequences on pupil learning, education, school-life, and even future life chances. Although the Department for Education has recommended that schools continually plan for and prioritise pupil wellbeing, we know that schools already have many things to focus on, as well as time and budget constraints.

Working closely with school staff and families alike, we’ve been delivering counselling to primary pupils in Tower Hamlets, many of whom come from families who are facing housing precariousness or financial exclusion. With the many ups and downs that schools have faced this year, with schooling disrupted for so many pupils, we are really proud that we can support the mental health and wellbeing of the youngest in our communities this year.

Classroom display Pupil counselling: Why and how 

Could you share more about the impact of pupil counselling? And what types of challenges have pupils been facing?

There is a similarity in a lot of cases that when we go to uncover the root cause, it’s often to do with self-confidence, self-esteem, not feeling safe, not feeling secure. So, kind of like the foundations of people. Alot of these referrals come with outbursts of aggression or tearfulness or being withdrawn and then when we go back, it always seems to be that the person isn’t confident; doesn’t have good self-esteem; doesn’t have good relationships at home; communication is poor; not being able to talk about emotions; not connecting how emotions feel within ourselves; responding to certain things in a negative way; and so on. It all has a big impact, and it all seems to go back to the same feeling of loneliness, fearfulness and not feeling sort of…there. Not feeling not protected, not nurtured, and often never ever enough praise and competence within the home.

“When we go to uncover the root cause, it’s often to do with self-confidence, self-esteem, not feeling safe, not feeling secure. So, kind of like the foundations of people.”

Describe any techniques, activities, and methods that have worked well with the children so far?

So, I use a range of different techniques. I’ve been using breathing exercises. I’ve been using sound therapy at the start of the sessions to get them calm and feeling safe so they’re able to talk. I’m using a lot of exercise with self-esteem and self-worth. So, looking at their qualities at their strengths, asking teachers and parents to praise them on this so that they encourage their positive traits to come out.

Also, in school we did the ‘Tree of Life’ and each branch had something different on it. And every time the children came to the sessions, they had to create leaves with an answer to each branch. So, one branch was ‘leave a kind word,’ one branch was ‘tell me something positive about yourself today,’ one was ‘tell me what your dream is or your goal for this week’. One was ‘what does a good friend mean to you?’ And the other one was, ‘what are you grateful for today?’ So that was lovely.

“Every time the children came to the sessions, they had to create leaves with an answer to each branch. So, one branch was ‘leave a kind word’, one branch was ‘tell me something positive about yourself today’, one was ‘tell me what your dream is or your goal for this week.”

And I’ve been giving homework to the counselling children for their parents and them to do together. This includes lots of work about what their worries are to help the parents and children talk about their worries, and how we can help our worries, so they don’t grow. Also, what do we like about each other and what do we like about ourselves – so self-esteem, self-empowering sheets to send home.

How does children’s counselling differ from counselling older children/young adults?

When I’m working with younger children, I use more visual more games and more artwork. With the older children, I can do like more activities like what I was just speaking to you and if the parents get involved, we noticed significant changes, especially with the activities that I sent home. I noticed that the parents that engaged with that the children we really do see change.

Tiana’s story: Holistic techniques and amazing outcomes

Tiana* was experiencing high levels of stress and difficulty concentrating in school, partly due to her parent’s separation and mum’s low mental health. The holistic support which included pupil counselling aimed to improve Tiana’s confidence, emotional awareness, and relationships with others.

“I am able to talk about what is bothering me, and I have learnt that it’s better to talk about how you feel instead of holding your feelings inside.”

After just a few sessions, Tiana started to open up about what was bothering her and what she needed help with. Reflecting on the talking sessions, Tiana said that “this was good because it helped me talk about how I felt, and it makes me feel better in my time with Gail. I am able to talk about what is bothering me, and I have learnt that it’s better to talk about how you feel instead of holding your feelings inside.”

Working closely with Tiana’s teachers and parents, Gail introduced a range of creative and holistic activities. This included developing a vision board with Tiana’s hopes and wishes, as well as photographs to illustrate each vision. This project was a great way for the whole family to be able to look at what Savannah wanted for her future, for herself and her family.  “Tiana’s hopes and wishes were for Mum and Dad to get along with each other, for Tianna to be a film producer or artist when she gets older, for her whole family to get along, the importance of family, and to let go of worries,” explained Gail.

“Both Tiana’s parents and teachers have noticed that Tiana is happier and more confident… With 10 being  the highest level, Tiana’s score for overall stress went from 10 to 2, emotional distress from 6 to 0, and hyperactivity and concentration in class from 6 to 1.”

Due to  their consistency and hard work, the family played a key role in the success of the programme. Gail mentioned that the family implemented their new tools like the ‘emotion cards’ which helped them all express their feelings to one another, especially Tiana and mum. “I didn’t express my feelings at home but now with the emotions card I can pick one and we can just pick them up instead of just saying how I feel,” said Tianna. She adds, “Mum told me yesterday that she feels sad when I was leaving and this made me feel happy that she said this as she would never say anything like this to me before, so it made me feel that she really does miss me when I go.”

Overall, the support led to some amazing outcomes and both Tiana’s parents and teachers have noticed that Tiana is happier and more confident. With 10 being  the highest level, Tiana’s score for overall stress went from 10 to 2, emotional distress from 6 to 0, and hyperactivity and concentration in class from 6 to 1.

*Name has been changed to protect client identity.

To find out more about our education support in schools or if you have any questions about the above, we’d love to hear from you. Contact us to arrange an informal chat at: info@kineara.co.uk or call 020 3976 1450.  

Posted by kineara in Community, Health and Wellbeing, Housing
Anna’s story: Fuel poverty and impossible choices

Anna’s story: Fuel poverty and impossible choices

This Fuel Poverty Awareness Day, we are joining NEA and others to raise awareness of this multi-faceted and preventable issue. Highlighting the experience of Anna and her family, you can support us and make a difference to those who are unfairly trapped in the vicious cycle of poverty.  


“A national injustice”

According to the NEA, around four million UK households are in the grip of fuel poverty, unable to afford to heat their homes and live comfortably as they should. On top of that, rising energy bills and unforgiving weather conditions are hitting low-income households the hardest. We’ve seen this first-hand at Kineara with many of our families being left in impossible situations, like having to choose between heating their home, paying the bills, or feeding their children.

Anna’s story: Fuel poverty and impossible choicesAnna’s story 

Anna has lived for 13 years on the top floor of a 23-story building with poor insulation and broken central heating. 

Trapped in a cycle of poverty, she pays £1400 a month for her flat so once that is paid there isn’t enough money to left cover the bills or get her heating fixed.  

She has a two year old son who she tries to keep as comfortable as possible, but now that the winter has set in it is getting harder. He’s an active little boy and want to go out to the park, but how will she warm him up when she gets back home? With little money for activities or to take him to a café to keep warm for a while, Anna does what she can to keep the house warm enough while they stay inside. 

I’ll go over to my friends house sometimes to warm up. If I could afford to, I would go to a café and sit inside to keep warm. But I don’t have any extra money to do that. 

And sometimes that means being forced into making decisions that could risk her health and safety. At times, she has no other option than to put the oven on get some heat into the room while her son watches cartoons. Sometimes he’ll ask her to blow on his hands to keep them warm. 

He’ll say “Mummy, please blow on my hands to keep them warm” like we are outside, except we’re sitting inside our living room… Sometimes I don’t have any other option than to turn on the oven, at least so my son can keep warm in the evening. 

And when she can afford it, a hot bath can help. But even that can be unappealing. When she steps out into a cold room, her teeth start to chatter, and the only solution is to get into bed with a hot water bottle. 

Hands holding hearts- winter appealDonate to our appeal 

With little money for phone credit, accessing services is really difficult and getting hold of the landlord to send engineer to repair the heating is near impossible. Each winter, the coldest months already have gone by before she has her concerns taken seriously.  

Every winter I call and call to get someone to come and fix the heating, but the whole winter goes by before anything is done. I don’t have the money to pay for an engineer.

This winter, we want to help Anna to keep warm through the coldest months. No-one should the stark choices that she is having to make for herself and her son. We’re advocating for her to fix the disrepair in her home, but you could help her and others like her to cover some bills over the winter, keep the hot water on and their mobile phone topped up. Even a small amount can make a huge difference.  

Donate what you can today! 

To help us support more families over the winter, please donate to our winter appeal. All donations will go directly to families for essential items they need over the winter period.

Posted by kineara in Community, Health and Wellbeing, Housing
Wellbeing, warmth and how to take action this Winter

Wellbeing, warmth and how to take action this Winter

Last year, Jesse and her son spent the winter in one of the worst housing situations we’d seen. The property was in complete disrepair, with mould on the walls, leaks, no heating or hot water. When we met her just before Christmas, she told us she’d spent the last year having to boil the kettle to wash and sleeping in her coat to stay warm. Her landlord wanted to evict her due to unpaid rent and Jesse was also desperate to move but the situation was causing a lot of anxiety and stress. As a part time carer with a son in full time education, the housing options in the private sector were very limited, but she was placed in temporary accommodation quickly so that she could move out of the hazardous flat. We helped her assess her needs and options, access emergency grants and a bidding number for social housing and supported her to secure a new property in August. When we checked in with her, her wellbeing had improved dramatically: “I am not worried about being cold this winter!”


Winter can be challenging on anyone’s mental wellbeing. For the people we support in our Covid Private Renters Project, this winter is going to be especially difficult. It is well known that there is a strong connection between levels of deprivation and mental health risks. And for the 80% of households in financial hardship that we support, everyday comforts that help many of us withstand the challenges of winter are not easy to come by.

On wellbeing

While virtually all services like ours make it their aim to improve the wellbeing of our service users, wellbeing itself has become a word so widely used that its real meaning can at times get lost. Services, funders and commissioning bodies across the sector have integrated wellbeing into outcomes and impact targets, understanding the value of improving wellbeing for people in the lowest socioeconomic groups. But despite the widespread use of the term and frameworks, we at Kineara still like to reflect on some questions.

So, what is wellbeing really? Is it the same for everyone? And is it something that is available to us all equally?

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing describes it like this:

“Wellbeing encompasses the environmental factors that affect us, and the experiences we have throughout our lives. These can fall into traditional policy areas of economy, health, education and so on. But wellbeing also crucially recognises the aspects of our lives that we determine ourselves: through our own capabilities as individuals; how we feel about ourselves; the quality of the relationships that we have with other people; and our sense of purpose.”

So an important element in wellbeing includes our self-determination, our ability and capacity to make choices for ourselves and a sense of purpose in our daily lives.

The families and individuals we support are often limited in the choices they can make for themselves. Most face multiple layers of deprivation which create barriers to stability that are socially determined – a good example is the benefit cap which pushes families with children into poverty by limiting the amount of benefits they can receive. As a result, choosing between heating your home or getting new clothes for the children simply isn’t a real choice. For some families, heating isn’t even an option. Instead, getting hold of a few hot water bottles is the best choice to manage the coming winter so they can keep up with other bills. This is why we are raising money this year to help our families get trough the winter with some comfort.

“Working with Kineara has been life changing. I now have options I never thought I would have.”


Why work on wellbeing?

National statistics from before the pandemic showed that in the UK, just 14% of people have high wellbeing while 70% rate their wellbeing as average. Since the pandemic began, a number of reports show that mental health and wellbeing have deteriorated significantly. This is especially true for communities with higher deprivation and in children and young people. The truth is, however, the downward trend in national wellbeing scores has been a reality for some time.

There are other important national trends that have impacted communities during this period. Changes to benefits that have amounted to serious financial cutbacks for low-income families, increases in rental and house prices with a simultaneous decrease in available homes for social rent, huge cuts to essential services at the local level, from hospitals and GPs to our local youth clubs and employment, disability, social care and mental health services.

In this context, it may seem counterproductive to keep a focus on wellbeing – how much difference can we make when low-income communities across London like the ones we work with are facing such significant practical barriers to financial stability?

The answer is, a lot!

“The support you gave me was amazing. If not for you I’d be living on the streets. I’m now in a new place of my own. You were there when I had no-one else and I’ll always be grateful for you and all the help you gave me.”

The process of facing and overcoming barriers does not happen overnight, but often, a few key changes can make a huge difference to how our service users feel about themselves and the situation they are facing. For some, it is about unlocking grants and financial support to boost incomes and start getting on top of debts and bills. For others it is about getting items of furniture, like separate beds for the children or curtains on the wall, so that even a temporary flat can feel like a home they can rest and feel safe in.

The practical changes we can support people to make often give them a fresh perspective on what they are capable of. And our emotional support encourages them to keep in mind what is possible, and to always reach out when they need help.
“If I needed someone to talk to, she was there. When I needed money for food or for the bus, she helped me secure a grant or provided a bit of money for my Oyster card. I know that any issue, big or small, is as important to Kineara as the next one. And this is something that I really appreciated. I don’t know what I would have done without her. You guys saves lives, you really do.”

To help us support more families over the winter, please donate to our winter appeal. All donations will go directly to families for essential items they need over the winter period.

Posted by kineara in Community, Health and Wellbeing, Housing, Impact
Donate to our Winter Appeal

Donate to our Winter Appeal

80% of the households we support are living with financial hardship.

Some people cannot afford their heating and electric bills or Council Tax and find themselves in debt and arrears. Others, over a third of households, have used emergency food vouchers and local food banks in the last year, many of them families with young children.

And over 60% of people we support say Covid effected their ability to pay the rent.

But everyone we meet is facing impossible choices this winter as the cold starts to bite. To help tide families over the hardest months, even a small donation can make a huge difference.

Please donate today so that no-one we support has go without essentials this winter. Donate today!

 

What your support can help us achieve:

Names and images have been changed for privacy purposes.

Last winter Olivia was evicted from a flat with serious disrepair that was cold, damp and unsafe. When we met her she was in temporary accommodation and in dispute with her landlord over unpaid rent. We supported the challenge against her landlord, applied for hardship grants and secured her a new home to live in.

When I first met you, I was cold and upset. Now I feel things are much better, more affordable…and I am not worried about being cold this winter.”

Posted by kineara in Community, Health and Wellbeing, Housing, Latest
Covid renters support project ends a successful first year

Covid renters support project ends a successful first year

The Covid Private Renters Project aims to tackle rising housing insecurity and evictions of renters in the private sector. Using wraparound, holistic support that has been the hallmark of Kineara’s services, the project aimed to provide advice and support to low-income renters facing a threat of eviction. It is modelled on Kineara’s intensive Rent Support Programme which had been delivered with successful outcomes to social sector tenants between 2012 and 2016.

Read the report here. 

When the Covid 19 pandemic began in early 2020, we wanted to respond to the possible impact of both the pandemic and the restrictions on those already most economically and socially vulnerable. We also became concerned, as did many across the housing sector, that the Government’s moratorium on evictions, announced in March 2020,would end in September that year with a flood of possession notices for renters whose incomes had been affected by the pandemic or who otherwise had been unable to keep up with rent.

This evaluation is an opportunity to share progress, outcomes and learnings so far, along with case studies and future plans for the project. With thanks to our partners, Southwark Law Centre, Southwark Council’s Private Rented Sector Team and Impact on Urban Health.

Posted by kineara in Health and Wellbeing, Housing
A focus group: Life and debt in temporary accommodation

A focus group: Life and debt in temporary accommodation

We hear from people we’ve supported on their experiences of temporary accommodation and what councils and support services can do better.

There are currently over 250,000 people living in temporary accommodation across the UK, a figure which jumped by 6000 in the first three months of the Covid crisis. With a chronic lack of social housing and unaffordable rental prices in the private market, too many people are trapped in temporary accommodation without the means to move on. 

But what is the real experience of living in temporary accommodation? Last month, we were approached by Oak Foundation and Trust for London to take part in research about the lives of people living in temporary accommodation and the kinds of support and advocacy available to them.  

We hosted a focus group with 6 people we’ve supported over the last year in our housing projects, to hear about the challenges they have faced and their view on what could help them and others who are living in temporary accommodation. 

And before the conversation could start, one of the common problems that we’ve supported families with cropped up: could everyone get online for the Zoom call? For Gary, the only way was to go over to a friends house and get Wifi access from there because he’d been unable to top up electricity that week. But it was important to him to join us and share his experience: “I was homeless, the Refugee Council connected me with Council support, they gave me a hotel room but I never saw the case worker, it was all over the phone. I saw a place that was all one room, I signed the contract.” 

In Gary’s case, an error meant the benefit cap wasn’t taken into consideration when he signed the agreement. Unable to work and with little to live on after the rent is paid, day to day life is a struggle. “Now I’m living on £200 for a month. I didn’t know how I’m going to live, I can’t top up electric, it is very complicated for me and very traumatizing.” 

When you’re suffering from mental health, its difficult – its like trying to put a jigsaw puzzle together in the dark.

Our other participants could relate to the stress caused by the mismatch in benefits and high rent prices, even in TA. When Ajay got his temporary accommodation, he set up a  direct debit to cover the utilities and believed his housing benefit would cover the rent. He explains, “I’m going about doing as I should, then 10 months after I was told I was going to be evicted because I hadn’t paid the rent and I’d got into all this debt. I didn’t even know. If it wasn’t for Kineara I don’t know what would happen.” 

For Rick, it took two years to get his housing benefit and was moved twice in that time. The housing he was moved to didn’t feel safe, and he wasn’t sleeping due to  the stress. It was also hard to get the right information at the right time from council services, saying “They often they tell you ‘I’ll get back to you, I have to check.’ Once I travelled in to the office only to be told to write in.”

Angel, who works part time and whose son is a full time student, had similar frustrations: “They told me ‘Don’t worry, housing benefit will cover it, just make an application’. The arrears kept going up and up. Its frustrating. They need to communicate better – its currently very poor.” Another added, “It seems that different Council offices have different systems to manage who is coming in, one team doesn’t speak to the other.” 

So what did the group think could be improved to better support people through and out of temporary accommodation? Many of them described feeling like they weren’t cared about, even feeling like a burden on society. “Then you fall through the cracks and enter world of desperation due to mental relapses, and then you become more of a burden.” 

They also wanted to see council services be considerate to the multiple barriers and hardships that they experience, because when they don’t, it feels like they’re being set up to fail. “And you need that when you’re suffering from mental health, because its difficult – its like trying to put a jigsaw puzzle together in the dark.” 

For others, the most important thing was also the most simple – to have someone by their side, listening to what they were going through and advocating for them through crisis. “Big thanks for Carly, because I [felt] abandoned but Carly started fighting for my case. She’s been helping me get set up, like with Council Tax which I didn’t know about.”  

As we wrapped up our conversation, it was clear that the opportunity to meet and share stories had been important to everyone. “So much of  my experience has been reflected today… its been useful because you feel alone.”

This focus group was hosted on behalf of Oak Foundation and Trust for London’s ongoing research project exploring advocacy and support in temporary accommodation. To find out more about the project, contact leila@leilabaker.net and ugo@trustforlondon.org.uk.

*Names have been changed for privacy purposes

Posted by kineara in Community, Employment, Health and Wellbeing, Housing, Research
How holistic tenancy support for renters with complex needs is helping to transform lives

How holistic tenancy support for renters with complex needs is helping to transform lives

Working with the most vulnerable Southern Housing Group customers, Reframe is a holistic support programme for tenants at risk of losing their tenancy, particularly due to high rent arrears or anti-social behaviour. We provide essential support for tenants going through major challenges, from mental and physical health, drug and alcohol misuse, domestic abuse to financial hardship. 

Holistic tenancy sustainment, especially through early intervention, is an approach that we’ve been delivering and championing over many years. By working to uncover the root causes of insecure tenancies, and helping to develop relationships between tenants, housing officers, and local/social services, tenants we support can not only sustain their housing but are supported to face other major challenges that have also been affecting their housing, and their lives. We’re currently working with 15 SHG tenants with complex needs and will continue to take on referrals and assess these on a case-by-case basis.

Sonia, Kineara’s Reframe practitioner, said that our service is helping tenants develop more independence, re-engage with services, and start to take control of their own lives. She explained that a number of hard-to-reach clients are “now open to housing service support as they recognise that they need it.” One client, for example, whose home was hoarded, and mental and physical health had begun to deteriorate, “thanked me for being there for him, letting him realise his self- worth, and giving him the confidence to get up and start doing things.” Another client with alcohol addiction and suicidal thoughts has also received ongoing support and a listening ear –  a challenging case which would have worsened without the support.

The Covid-19 pandemic continues to exacerbate existing hardships and impact vulnerable tenants in acute ways, including a number of tenants we’re supporting being hospitalised with the virus, and others falling behind with rent. There is often not just one reason why rent arrears build up. Reframe’s tailored support, as well as understanding wider issues impacting tenants, is what makes the programme so transformational for the hardest-to-reach.

If you know of an SHG tenant that may benefit from this support, contact: referrals@kineara.co.uk For more information, contact: info@kineara.co.uk or 0203 976 1450

Posted by kineara in Housing
New Covid eviction prevention project for Southwark residents gets underway

New Covid eviction prevention project for Southwark residents gets underway

PRESS RELEASE
November 2020

Our new programme will provide essential intensive support to renters in the private sector who are threatened with eviction

We’re excited to announce a new Covid Private Renters Project for tenants in Southwark, delivering our intensive 10-week intervention with residents with complex needs to address arrears, financial hardship, health and wellbeing concerns that have led to an insecure tenancy.

We’ve developed a unique intervention for tenants and landlords that combines intensive practical and wellbeing support, legal advice, and mediation. It is designed to meet a pressing current need in which legal uncertainties around eviction, increasing arrears and financial hardship, and insecure employment could potentially lead to a rise in homelessness across the UK. The project aims to prevent that by strengthening landlord-tenant communication and supporting mediation, as well as specialist legal support provided our partners, Southwark Law Centre.

The programme will be delivered in partnership with Southwark Council and Southwark Law Centre with funding from Guys’ and St Thomas’ Charity. As the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated, housing is a key driver of health, and secure, safe housing is foundational to our health outcomes. We’re excited to be collaborating with these partners to support the health and wellbeing of residents in the Southwark by addressing housing as a social determinant of health.

Councillor Helen Dennis, cabinet member for social support and homelessness, said: “Tackling homelessness has always been best approached as prevention rather than cure. So we’re delighted to be able to support those in the private sector who are vulnerable to becoming homeless due to eviction. Alongside Kineara and Southwark Law Centre, we hope to use a collaborative approach to help people remain in a safe and secure home with their families, especially during such difficult and economically uncertain times.”

The project comes at a critical time for renters in the private sector, as the Government’s eviction moratorium came to an end on 20th September. Shelter estimates that over 300,000 renters have fallen into arrears since the pandemic started, with perhaps many more in danger of being made homeless once the furlough scheme ends and unemployment rises.

Kieron Boyle, CEO at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity says: “We know that the economic impact of the pandemic disproportionately affects those who already shoulder the greatest burden of ill health. We’re delighted to be working with Kineara, Southwark Council and the Southwark Law Centre to protect the health of those at risk of eviction. Through a package of practical support we can help prevent insecure housing driving health inequalities. This will have impact locally as well as important lessons for national policy.”

ENDS

Notes to editors:

About Kineara

Kineara is an award winning community interest company that offers holistic support services to families, individuals and young people going through challenges in housing, education and employment.

About Southwark Law Centre

Southwark Law Centre is a charity whose mission is the relief of poverty, suffering and distress through the provision of free, specialist and confidential legal advice.

About Guys’ St Thomas’ Charity

Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity is an independent urban health foundation. They work with Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and others to improve health in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, and beyond.

For media enquiries contact Melanie Sirinathsingh on 07800545607 and msirinathsingh@kineara.co.uk, or visit our website www.kineara.co.uk

Posted by kineara in Community, Housing, Latest